I'm Aaron, an environmental geology major from Houston. I do research in planetary geology and in my spare time I study sustainable development.

For fun, I dabble a bit in fiction writing, video game editing, multimedia programs, and following science news.

I love science because it provides me with a sense of wonder towards the world around me...it makes me feel alive!

13th September 2013

Photo reblogged from Michiru of the Sea with 359,738 notes

monorue:

no worries friend
rotate
seal rotate
no worries when rotate

monorue:

no worries friend

rotate

seal rotate

no worries when rotate

Tagged: sealNaturewildlifeanimalanimalsswimmingphotographysciencecutehappyfun

Source: vimeo

13th September 2013

Photoset reblogged from i want to take the ears off with 146,873 notes

manuxinhace:

Fox News talks about working mothers’ negative impact on their children. AKA “When Fox News gets so misogynistic that their own anchor is 1026% done with them.” [x]

Tagged: sciencegenderequalitydiscriminationFox NewsFoxnewsObamaBarack ObamaPresident ObamaPresident Barack Obamapresidentinteracial marriageraceracialracial discriminationmisogynymisogynisticmothersworking motherswomen

Source: everlarkdandelions

13th September 2013

Link with 1 note

South Korea to Build World's First "invisible" Skyscraper in Seoul →

Interesting building concept…we’ll see how this turns out.

Tagged: sciencetechnologyengineeringskyscraperskyscrapersbuildingdevelopmenturbanurban planningconstructiondesignexterior designcitySeoulKoreaSouth KoreainvisibletowertechinnovationLED

12th September 2013

Link with 25 notes

NASA Announcement: Voyager 1 has LEFT the SOLAR SYSTEM!!! →

History is made today. Wow. If you’re reading this post, I give you a virtual high-five…we’re officially an interstellar exploring civilization. Congratulations, Humankind.

Tagged: NASAspaceVoyagerVoyager 1interstellarinterstellar spacesciencesatellliteprobespace probegolden recordsgolden recordnewscurrent eventsbreakingbreaking newsnational aeronautics and space administrationhistoryworld historyhumanityhumankindhuman familyone worldworld peacetechnologytechJPLNASA JPLjet propulsion laboratoryphysics

12th September 2013

Link

Kemosabe, the Cutest Porcupine Snacks on Bananas →

Tagged: porcupineKemosabecutewildlifeanimalsanimaltree fortanimal wonderskemocoendouSouth AmericarainforestbananasNaturescience

12th September 2013

Photoset reblogged from SciShow with 3,849 notes

sciencesoup:

Living Fossils

Located in Hamelin’s Pool, a shallow area of Shark Bay in Western Australia, these odd formations aren’t rocks—they’re stromatolites, and they were built over millennia by single-celled cyanobacteria (also known as blue-green algae). 4,000 to 6,000 years ago, a huge bank of seagrass began to block the tidal flow into Hamelin’s Pool, which meant that the water became twice as salty as the open ocean. Animals like snails and chitons that would usually feed on the algae couldn’t survivd, so the blue-green algae began to flourish. Gathered in colonies, they trapped sediment with their sticky surface coatings. This sediment reacted with calcium carbonate in the water and formed limestone, essentially creating a living fossil—this limestone is alive, its top surface layer teeming with active cyanobacteria. The limestone builds up slowly at a rate of about 1mm per year. The stromatolites in Shark Bay are estimated to be between 3,000 and 2,000 years old, but they’re similar to life forms in Precambrian times, 3.5 billion years ago, at the dawn of complex organisms. There are over 50 kinds of cyanobacteria in Shark Bay, and one is thought to have descended from an organism that lived nearly 2 million years ago, making it a part of one of the longest biological lineages.

(Image Credit: 1, 2)

Tagged: Hamelin's PoolShark BayAustraliaWestern AustraliastromatolitescyanobacteriabacteriamicrobialmicrobesbiologygeologygeoscienceNaturesciencelifefossilfossilsmarineseaoceanoceansseaswaterlimestone

Source: sciencesoup

12th September 2013

Photo reblogged from NASA with 5,819 notes

spaceexp:

The Moon Seen from the International Space Station — the limb of Earth is near the bottom transitioning into the orange-colored troposphere

spaceexp:

The Moon Seen from the International Space Station — the limb of Earth is near the bottom transitioning into the orange-colored troposphere

Tagged: ISSInternational Space StationSpace StationSpaceorbitLow Earth OrbitLEOMoonThe MoonskytroposphereEarth

Source: spaceexp

12th September 2013

Photo reblogged from Mother Nature Network with 64 notes

mothernaturenetwork:

Life found in the muck of Antarctic lakeResearchers grew 20 cultures of microbes found in the uppermost layer of the sediment core of Lake Hodgson that could give insight into how life formed on Earth.

mothernaturenetwork:

Life found in the muck of Antarctic lake
Researchers grew 20 cultures of microbes found in the uppermost layer of the sediment core of Lake Hodgson that could give insight into how life formed on Earth.

Tagged: biogeologybiologygeologygeosciencescienceresearchAntarcticamicrobesLake HodgsonlakeHodgsonlife

12th September 2013

Photo reblogged from This is a Nature blog. with 1,840 notes

woodendreams:

(by _Zinni_)

woodendreams:

(by _Zinni_)

Tagged: GreecetravelphotographyNature

12th September 2013

Photo reblogged from RORSCHACHX with 419 notes

rorschachx:

Kingfisher | image by Mark Bridger

rorschachx:

Kingfisher | image by Mark Bridger

Tagged: KingfisherwildlifebirdsbirdanimalsphotographyNature